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New Brunswick languages commissioner says province still not getting bilingualism right

New Brunswick languages commissioner says province still not getting bilingualism right
Canada
The official languages commissioner in New Brunswick – Canada’s only officially bilingual province – says the government still isn’t getting it right.

Katherine d’Entremont is recommending a new secretariat to help ensure compliance with a law enacted nearly 50 years ago.

In her final report as commissioner, d’Entremont says the percentage of New Brunswickers whose mother tongue is French reached a low of 31.9 per cent in 2016, compared to 33.8 per cent in 1971.

The percentage of New Brunswickers whose mother tongue is English has remained stable at about 65 per cent.

D’Entremont says the government’s current plan to achieve the objectives of the Official Languages Act is yielding few concrete results.

She says New Brunswick needs to ensure the future vitality of the French language, promote both official languages at work and take advantage of its bilingual workforce.

She says there should be a deputy minister for Official Languages, just as there is for other areas such as Corporate Communications and Women’s Equality.
Read more on globalnews.ca
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