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How To Cover Video Game News When Everything s A Mess - Kotaku

How To Cover Video Game News When Everything s A Mess - Kotaku
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Last weekend, I immersed myself in the sights and sounds of a busy convention floor at BlizzCon in Anaheim, California. It was work—interviews, hands-on gameplay, meeting with contacts. It was also a chance to see friends. Through it all, I felt guilty. As controversies mounted, I was forced to navigate my guilt in the middle of a massive celebration.

BlizzCon, Blizzard Entertainment’s yearly celebration of their properties and games, is unlike the frantic helter skelter of E3 or the straight-laced interfacing of the Game Developers Conference. It’s a party, a gaming jamboree where old friends gather, themed beverages flow, and throngs of fans cheer as new game announcements come. There’s an energy to BlizzCon that I’ve not found anywhere else; it feels like a class reunion. If your classmate was a level 120 orc shaman.

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Unfortunately, everything surrounding my BlizzCon felt like a disaster. At first, my disappointment was entirely personal. I had originally planned to attend BlizzCon as a personal trip with a close friend, not as a work trip; my coworker Nathan Grayson was already covering the event for us at Kotaku. But as the event approached, that plan changed and it became more of a work trip. Then, a significant Blizzard controversy unfolded: the company punished a pro Hearthstone player for . It sparked an international conversation, with American politicians speaking out against Blizzard’s decision.

I ended up attending the event as a journalist. That altered my approach. This wasn’t going to be a mini-vacation with friends, where I shot the shit and kept it loose. Instead, it would involve navigating a controversy by which folks were rightly angered. The inciting incident was straightforward—I think Blizzard’s initial punishment against Ng Wai Chung was too hard—but it had wider implications that were more complicated. I was frustrated to see commentary from people who seemed to have become experts in Hong Kong politics overnight. I was skeptical of politicians playing into anti-Chinese xenophobia. I was also personally conflicted. If I enjoyed a game, which seemed likely, I would undoubtedly anger some readers and fans who expected a hardline stance on my end. It felt, in some ways, like a balancing act I couldn’t manage. Give developers a fair shake, support and acknowledge the disappointment of fans. There’s a pressure when you’re in any semi-public position to be perfect; to please everyone. That didn’t seem possible. It doesn’t feel possible even as I write this.

It would soon become even more difficult for me and Nathan to cover BlizzCon. Two days before I got on a plane to the event, Deadspin deputy editor Barry Petchesky was fired here at G/O Media. Over the next few days, the rest of Deadspin’s staff followed. By the end of the day on Friday, the entirety of Deadspin’s editorial staff had either been fired or quit.

Imagine you’re on a plane and when you land, you learn that some of the most talented people, people whose work has inspired you and who have pushed you to do better, are now gone. Now imagine you need to be in the same city as Disneyland, in the middle of convention that’s essentially a theme park unto itself.

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The guilt kept creeping back in. We were working while other folks at our company were walking out, deciding they’d had enough. What kind of asshole was I? But, there was undoubtedly work to do. I did the interview prep, committed to the best possible job. The readers deserve it.

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Again, though, this work was not without its other complications. Protesters , enraged at the treatment of Blitzchung. If I played Diablo IV and wrote about how I enjoyed it, was I letting people down? Was I letting down Deadspin, writing BlizzCon articles as though nothing had happened?

I realized that furiously tossing myself into work wasn’t possible. I could not just ignore the guilt and the grief that I felt. Trying to put it aside had helped for a time, giving me the focus and drive to get from one part of the day to the next. But grief demands to be released or else it curdles like old milk left in the fridge. I found that release in an unexpected place, right in the middle of Blizzard’s game announcements.

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As the event wore on, I realized that I not only needed to let myself cry. I also needed to let myself feel joy. If I was going to get the job done at BlizzCon, I needed to allow myself to feel whatever I was going to feel, in order to move forward. So I did, and as a result, it ended up being an experience I’ll remember fondly. Yes, I still asked hard questions in interviews, and there was still a tension in the air. But whether I was spending time with friends or talking to enthusiastic developers, I found myself taking joy in the work. I let myself feel that joy, as well. Part of me still feels bad about that. Grief can trick us into thinking we’re not allowed to be happy, even for a moment. But it’s just that: a trick.
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