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Gordon Lightfoot, Natalie MacMaster join Glass Tiger on their first holiday album

Gordon Lightfoot, Natalie MacMaster join Glass Tiger on their first holiday album
Entertainment
The band from Newmarket, Ont. released “Songs for a Winter’s Night,” a 10-track collection of largely original music for the holidays.

Nova Scotia fiddler Natalie MacMaster, pop singer Roch Voisine and Lebanese-Canadian soprano Isabel Bayrakdarian all appear on songs.

And Gordon Lightfoot briefly ducks in to read the “Ode for a Winter’s Night,” a poem written by lead singer Alan Frew.

“Songs for a Winter’s Night” follows last year’s release of Glass Tiger’s “33,” their first EP of original material in nearly three decades.

The band is best known for their chart-topping hit “Don’t Forget Me When I’m Gone,” with backing vocals from Bryan Adams, and other songs including “Someday” and “My Town,” featuring Rod Stewart.

Glass Tiger joins an array of Canadians who’ve unveiled Christmas-themed music this year. Carly Rae Jepsen’s “It’s Not Christmas Till Somebody Cries” and Tegan and Sara’s “Make You Mine This Season” are two songs that have been released in recent days.
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