News

Global warming to increase violent crime in the United States

"Depending on how quickly temperatures rise, we could see two to three million more violent crimes between now and the end of the century than there would be in a non-warming world," said Ryan Harp, researcher at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at the University of Colorado Boulder and lead author of a new study published today in Environmental Research Letters.

In 2018, Harp and his coauthor, Kris Karnauskas, CIRES Fellow and associate professor in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at CU Boulder, mined an FBI crime database and NOAA climate data to identify a set of compelling regional connections between warming and crime rates, especially in winter. Warmer winters appeared to be setting the stage for more violent crimes like assault and robbery, likely because less nasty weather created more opportunities for interactions between people.

Now, the team has projected additional future violent crimes in the United States, by combining the mathematical relationships they uncovered in previous work with output from 42 state-of-the-art global climate models. The team accounted for key factors that previous studies have overlooked, including variations in crime rates across seasons and for different regions of the country.

"We are just beginning to scratch the surface on the myriad ways climate change is impacting people, especially through social systems and health," Karnauskas said. "We could see a future where results like this impact planning and resource allocation among health, law enforcement and criminal justice communities."

Materials provided by . Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

University of Colorado at Boulder. "Global warming to increase violent crime in the United States." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 January 2020. .

University of Colorado at Boulder. "Global warming to increase violent crime in the United States." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/01/200115093437.htm (accessed January 15, 2020).
Read more on sciencedaily.com
News Topics :
Similar Articles :
Science
First, El Niño brought warmer water to the Coral Sea in 2016, threatening Australia s Great Barrier Reef s corals. Long term global warming meant even more heat in the region,...
Technology
Oil and gas production has doubled in some parts of the United States in the last two years, and scientists can use satellites to see impacts of that trend a...
Science
As the 21st century progresses, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide CO2 concentrations will cause urban and indoor levels of the gas to increase, and that may significantly reduce our basic decision making...
Technology
On April 1, water managers across the West use the amount of snowpack present as a part of a simple equation to calculate the available water supply for a given...
Science
In a first ever study using ozone data collected by commercial aircraft, researchers from the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences CIRES at the University of Colorado Boulder found that...