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Smartphone sensor data has potential to detect cannabis intoxication

Smartphone sensor data has potential to detect cannabis intoxication
Science
A smartphone sensor, much like what is used in GPS systems, might be a way to determine whether or not someone is intoxicated after consuming marijuana, according to a new study by the Rutgers Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research.

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According to the study, published in Drug and Alcohol Dependence, which evaluated the feasibility of using smartphone sensor data to identify episodes of cannabis intoxication in the natural environment, a combination of time features (tracking the time of day and day of week) and smartphone sensor data had a 90 percent rate of accuracy.

The researchers analyzed daily data collected from young adults who reported cannabis use at least twice per week. They examined phone surveys, self-initiated reports of cannabis use, and continuous phone sensor data to determine the importance of time of day and day of week in detecting use and identified which phone sensors are most useful in detecting self-reported cannabis intoxication.

They found that time of day and day of week had 60 percent accuracy in detecting self-reporting of cannabis intoxication and the combination of time features and smartphone sensor data had 90 percent accuracy in detecting cannabis intoxication.

Travel patterns from GPS data -- at times when they reported feeling high -- and movement data from accelerometer that detects different motions, were the most important phone sensor features for detection of self-reported cannabis intoxication.

Researchers used low burden methods (tracking time of day and day of week and analyzing phone sensor data) to detect intoxication in daily life and found that the feasibility of using phone sensors to detect subjective intoxication from cannabis consumption is strong.

Future research should investigate the performance of the algorithm in classifying intoxicated versus not intoxicated reports in those who use cannabis less frequently. Researchers should study reports of intoxication using tools that law enforcement might use showing a stronger correlation with self-reported cannabis use.

Study authors include faculty from Stevens Institute of Technology, Stanford University, Carnegie Mellon University, University of Tokyo, Japan, and University of Washington, Seattle.

Materials provided by Rutgers University . Original written by Nicole Swenarton. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Rutgers University. "Smartphone sensor data has potential to detect cannabis intoxication: New report demonstrates how phone sensor data, such as GPS, can be used to detect cannabis intoxication in young adults.." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 September 2021. .

Rutgers University. "Smartphone sensor data has potential to detect cannabis intoxication: New report demonstrates how phone sensor data, such as GPS, can be used to detect cannabis intoxication in young adults.." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/09/210926102237.htm (accessed September 27, 2021).

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